ADA Resurfacing Technical Assistance Webinar – 8/20

Update 1: The webinar filled quickly; Registration is now closed. I’ll add links to the recorded session once it becomes available.

Update 2: FHWA is looking to secure an additional date to deliver another webinar. I’ll share the new session info once the details become available.

Update 3: I posted information about an additional scheduled webinar HERE.

Federal Highway Administration’s staff from the Offices of Chief Counsel, Infrastructure, and Civil Rights will be delivering a webinar on August 20, 2013 at 11 am PDT to clarify and answer questions raised by the recently issued joint technical assistance on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements to provide curb ramps. HERE is a brief providing an overview of June 28th notification from the Department of Justice and Department of Transportation.

The session will be recorded, but to register and participate live in the webinar, access this link:

For additional information about the webinar, contact Jeffrey Zaharewicz, FHWA LTAP/TTAP Program Manager, at 702-235-0991 or jeffrey.zaharewicz@dot.gov.

About David Giongco

David is a registered civil engineer with the Caltrans Division of Local Assistance. Learn more about him here and connect with him on Twitter and at LinkedIn.

6 thoughts on “ADA Resurfacing Technical Assistance Webinar – 8/20

  1. We whole heartedly agree that projects that are deemed to be alterations must include curb ramps within the scope of the project; however, we disagree that cape seals should be considered alterations as indicated in the briefing memo.

    Cape Seals as used in our city is a combination of a chip seal and slurry seal. They are used in a city setting because typically a chip seal by its self is not acceptable to citizens on residential streets due to the impacts of loose gravel that ravels from the surface over time.

    The following are some of the reasons that Cape Seals should not be considered an ADA Alteration. The contractors that complete cape seals are typically the same that complete chip and slurry seal. Their operations and skill sets usually do not include the capability to complete or coordinate concrete ramp work. Cape seals have traditionally been considered to give 4 to 7 years of life to a roadway and is currently not considered to be allowed to be Federally Funded for a Street Rehabilitation project on the MTS system. These reasons and more lead us to conclude that cape seals should be considered maintenance and should not require ADA Alterations.

    We hope you review this issue during the upcoming seminar and consider revising the Briefing Memo to indicate Cape Seals as ADA Maintenance . Currently the seminar is full so we will not be able to participate. If however you could provide information as to who we should contact to provide a formal response to this memo we would greatly appreciate it.

    Thanks,
    Keith R. Cooke

    • Hi Keith – I completely agree with you. Other agencies have expressed the same concerns that you’ve brought up regarding cape seals. I hope by sharing the info on my blog that more agencies become aware of the Joint Technical Assistance that was issued and provide feedback like you.As far as who to provide a response to, I recommend starting with your DLAE. The notification was recently published (7/8), so additional guidance on the topic is still pending. I wasn’t able to register either, but I will post links to the recorded session when it becomes available.

  2. Good morning,
    It appears this webinar is full; is there a way to get on the waiting list if anyone is not able to attend?

    Thank you,
    Jennifer K. Wilson

    • Hi Jennifer – I wasn’t able to register either. The point of contact for the webinar is Jeffrey Zaharewicz (contact info in the post) … he may be able to provide info about a waiting list.

  3. Pingback: Additional ADA Resurfacing Technical Assistance Webinar | Local Assistance Blog

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